YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS – ORIENTAL JEWS – AND EUROPEAN JEWS MERGING AFTER 1300 CE

YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS – ORIENTAL JEWS – AND EUROPEAN JEWS MERGING AFTER 1300 CE

Khazar Diaspora

900s CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — “Jewish-Khazarian settlement in Kiev can be traced to the 10th century; the Russian-speaking community was later absorbed by Yiddish-speaking immigrants from Central Europe.” — in the entry “Ukraine” in The Shengold Jewish Encyclopedia, edited by Klenicki, Schiff, and Schreiber (Schreiber Publishing, 1998 CE), page 267.

Click for Source Article on Khazar Diaspora

1100s CE-1300s CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — It seems that after the fall of their kingdom, the Khazars adopted the Cyrillic script (Early Cyrillic alphabet developed in 800s CE at the Preslav Literary School in the First Bulgarian Empire) in place of Hebrew and began to speak East Slavic (sometimes called “Canaanic” because Benjamin of Tudela (1130 CE-1173 CE) was a medieval Jewish traveler who visited Europe, Asia, and Africa and recorded vivid descriptions of western Asia preceding Marco Polo by a hundred years, called Kievan Rus the “Land of Canaan”. These Slavic-speaking Jews are documented to have lived in Kievan Rus. However, Yiddish-speaking Jewish immigrants from the west (especially Germany, Bohemia, and other areas of Central Europe) soon began to flood into Eastern Europe, and it is believed that these newer immigrants eventually outnumbered the Khazars. The two groups (eastern and western Jews) intermarried over the centuries. This idea is not new. In a footnote in Chapter 2 of History of the Jews in Russia and Poland Volume 1 (English translation, 1916 CE). The great Ashkenazic historian Simon Dubnow (1860 CE-1941 CE) writes: “It is quite possible that there was an admixture of settlers from the Khazar kingdom, from the Crimea, and from the Orient in general, who were afterwards merged with the western element.” (page 39).

1300 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — After 1300 CE Yiddish was the common language of almost all Eastern European Jews. Yiddish is alleged by the opponents of the Khazar theory to derive from the Rhine valley of Germany, even though linguistically this has been disproven by the professional linguists Robert D. King and Matthias Mieses.  Yiddish was only the latest in a succession of languages spoken among Jews of eastern Europe. The Slavic-speaking Jews of Kievan Rus, whose existence is now acknowledged by linguists helped in creating this post 1300 CE version of Yiddish. But the Khazar denying hand-waving and discounting continues to this day despite the evidence otherwise and such guilty parties include Hilary L. Rubinstein, Dan Cohn-Sherbok, Abraham J. Edelheit, and William D. Rubinstein — to these deniers the Khazars just vanished around 1237 CE and were never heard from again. Simply dishonest hand-waving fraud and distortion through omission — Motives and goals need to be questioned.

1880s CE-1890s CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — Abraham Elija Harkavy (1835 CE-1919 CE), a Russian-language historian was familiar with some of the basic Hebrew sources for Khazarian history and wrote that the Khazarian and Middle-Eastern Jews came into Poland. He wrote groups of Eastern European Jews, such as the Krymchaks, Karaims. and even many Ashkenazim, were descended from the Khazars.

1940s CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — Abraham N. Poliak, a Hebrew-language historian from Israel, wrote a book Kazariyah (first published in the 1940s CE) in which he argues that Eastern European Jews are predominantly Khazarian.

1940s CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — “The activities of certain groups among the Jews who immigrated to Poland in ancient times and engaged in agriculture is evidenced by the Jewish villages that we find in Poland and Russia during the early Middle Ages. The names of these villages prove the origin of the people who lived in them. They are: Zidow, Zhidowo, Sidowo, or Kozara, Kozari, and Kozhazhow. There can be little doubt that the earliest of them were those villages whose names derive from that of the Khazars. It is possible that these Jewish Khazar settlements came into being during the 10th century, when a wave of Khazar immigrants arrived in Poland and Russia seeking refuge after the collapse of their state.” — Itzhak Schipper (1884 CE-1943 CE), a Polish Jewish historian who wrote in Polish and Yiddish, argued that the Polish Jews are largely Khazarian.

1940s CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — Schipper said Khazarian Jews founded the Polish city of Ciechanowiec, partly because he thought that the nearby village of Kosarze and a street that he interpreted to be “Khazar Street” were traces of Khazars.

1958 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — J.S. Hertz, a Yiddish-language historian, in Ukrayne argued that most Ukrainian Jews and many other Eastern European Jews are Khazarian.

1970 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — “Jews from the Rhineland were invited to Poland… And in Poland these immigrants now found old settlements of Jews who spoke Slavic (Khazar), did not live in ghettos (though in separate sections of cities), and were not worried or threatened about their Jewishness. These Polish Jews assimilated their Ashkenazic brethren, newly arrived, and themselves began to speak – Yiddish.” — Leo Rosten, in The Joys of Yiddish (New York, NY: Pocket Books, 1970 CE), page 526.

1974 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — Arthur Koestler borrowed heavily from Poliak’s works when writing The Thirteenth Tribe. Early proponents of the Khazar theory included the Polish scholars Tadeusz Czacki (1765 CE-1813 CE) and Max (Maksymilian) Gumplowicz (1864 CE-1897 CE), the Ukrainian Jewish scholar Isaac Baer Levinsohn (1788 CE-1860 CE), and the Russian Jewish doctor/anthropologist Samuel Weissenberg (1867 CE-?) [in his 1895 CE book Die südrussischen Juden. Eine anthrometrische Studie].

1990 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — Ashkenazi only means they adopted Ashkenazi customs and though pale white they could have come from Khazaria or Germany or Russia or Poland or other locales. The label ”Ashkenazi” does not necessarily mean that all Ashkenazi Jews came from Germany but that they adopted Ashkenazi culture and Yiddish language. “Thus, it is plausible that Slavic-speaking Jewish communities in Eastern Europe (which existed there from early times) became dominated in the sixteenth century by Ashkenazi culture and adopted the Yiddish language.” — Benjamin Harshav, in The Meaning of Yiddish (Los Angeles and Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1990), pages 5-6.

1990 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — “..the most strongly Khazar of the Jews are undoubtedly the Hungarian Jews, descendants of the last Khazars who fled into Hungary about 1200 CE-1300 CE, where they were received by their former vassals, the Magyar kings. The Hungarian Jews are definitely a fusion of Semitic German Jews and the Turkic Khazars with some Sephardic immigrants who came to Hungary by way of Italy in the 1500s CE escaping the Spanish Inquisition.” — Monroe Rosenthal and Isaac Mozeson, in Wars of the Jews: A Military History from Biblical to Modern Times (New York, NY: Hippocrene Books, 1990 CE), page 224.

1991 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — Samuel V. Kurinsky (1917 CE-2004 CE), an American archaeologist with extensive knowledge of Jewish history, said that Jews from Khazaria settled in Ukraine, Belarus, and Poland in his 1991 CE book The Glassmakers.

1992 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — “It is very likely that Judaized Khazar elements, especially those that had acculturated to the cities, contributed to the subsequently Slavic-speaking Jewish communities of Kievan Rus’ (Ukraine and Russia today). These were ultimately absorbed by Yiddish-speaking Jews entering the Ukraine and Belorussia from Poland and Central Europe.” — Peter Benjamin Golden, in An Introduction to the History of the Turkic Peoples (Wiesbaden, Germany: Otto Harrassowitz, 1992), pages 243-244.

1996 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — Khazar words like yarmulka, meaning “skullcap” and davenen, meaning “to pray” are found in Yiddish. — Zeiden’s article on “Davenen: A Turkic Etymology” appeared in the Queens College journal Yiddish 10:2-3 (1996 CE) with a followup article in 1998 CE.

1998 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — Yiddish derives partly from Oriental and Khazar sources — The first five Jewish families to settle in the town of Eishyshok in Lithuania came from Babylonia. Since Eliach (whose family spoke Yiddish just like other Lithuanian Jews) herself claims descent from these Oriental Jews, that is perhaps another clue that Yiddish-speaking Eastern European Jews are the descendants of multiple migrations from diverse locations and not simply late-medieval arrivals from Germany. And there are many other historians and archaeologists who have argued that Russian and Polish Jews derive in part from Oriental and Khazarian Jews. — Yaffa Eliach book There Once Was A World: A 900-Year Chronicle of the Shtetl of Eishyshok Lithuania.

1999 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — “Of other Germanic or German-based languages, Yiddish did not take its final shape as a separate language of eastern, including EC, Europe until late medieval times. However, its immediate predecessor, Judeo-German (originating, as recent scholarship has shown, in Bavaria and Bohemia, and notably in the cities of Regensburg and Prague, and not, as was earlier thought, in the Rhine valley), spread, at least with the first wave of Jewish settlers, to Silesia, Poland proper, Lithuania, Belarus’, and western Ukraine during the high and later Middle Ages (1300s CE and later). Earlier Jewish ethnic groups had arrived in ECE (or its fringes) from the southeast: the former Khazaria (and beyond) and Kievan Rus’, switching in the new setting to some form of East Slavic speech, and from the Crimea – the so-called Karaites – who settled in Lithuania and Galicia and who long retained a mixture of Turko-Tataric and Hebrew.” — Henrik Birnbaum, “The Vernacular Languages of East Central Europe in the Medieval Period”, in “…The Man of Many Devices, Who Wandered Full Many Ways…”: Festschrift in Honor of János M. Bak, edited by Balázs Nagy and Marcell Sebõk (Budapest: Central European University Press, 1999 CE), page 385.

2000 CE-2001 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — Ukraine was called ‘East Canaan’ by the Khazars of Ukrainian — Alexander Beider (1963 CE-Today CE). The fact that there were Slavic-speaking Jews is proven beyond doubt in Alexander Beider’s book A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names (Avotaynu, 2001 CE).

2004 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — “Of course individuals who joined with Ashkenazic Jewry could have derived from the Bosporus, Taurus, or the Khazars, and many certainly derived from local non-Jewish populations. But the overwhelming majority of Ashkenazic Jewish stock hails from the Ashkenazic Jews of Central Europe, the original Ashkenaz on the German-speaking lands where the Ashkenaz civilization and its Yiddish language emerged around the turn of the millennium.” — The distinguished Yiddishist Dovid Katz wrote in Words on Fire: The Unfinished Story of Yiddish (Basic Books, 2004 CE) on page 132:

2008 CE: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — “…a rising tide of opinion, Yiddish spread…westward from Russia. The population explosion in Eastern European Jews can probably be accounted for by the voluntary mass conversion to Judaism in 740 CE by the Turkic Khazars, who had settled on the steppes of southern Russia.” — Neal Karlen, in The Story of Yiddish: How a Mish-mosh of Languages Saved the Jews (New York: William Morrow, 2008 CE), page 62.

FACT: Khazars were rabbinical Jews that used the Talmud. — We know now that the Khazars were Rabbinical Jews, while the Karaite sect vigorously opposes Rabbinical Judaism. The Khazars became Russian Ashkenazi of Khazar ancestry.

FACT: YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS — The so-called Khazarian recipes and poems among the Crimean Karaims are 20th century inventions and so was the faked planted gravestone of Rabbi Yitzhak ha-Sangari supposed converter of the Khazars to Judaism in the Karaim cemetery at Balti Tiimez in Chufut-Kale was a forgery. There never was a Rabbi as king of the Khazars, yet this hoax had the engraving of Sangari with the title “bek”, meaning “king”. In reality, the Khazar kings always had at least partial Turkic ancestry, even the dynasty of beks Aaron and Joseph.

Summary YIDDISH AND ASHKENAZI WERE THE RESULT OF THE KHAZARS, ORIENTAL JEWS, AND EUROPEAN JEWS MERGING AFTER 1300 CE.

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