PRESIDENT ABRAHAM LINCOLN QUOTES = A REPUBLICAN WHEN REPUBLICANS WERE FOR THE PEOPLE AND THE PARTY HAD CREDIBILITY

PRESIDENT ABRAHAM LINCOLN QUOTES = A REPUBLICAN WHEN REPUBLICANS WERE FOR THE PEOPLE AND THE PARTY HAD CREDIBILITY

Lincoln

“These capitalists generally act harmoniously and in concert, to fIeece the people”

— President LlNCOLN (R) – that is why he left the WHlGS

“The MONEY POWERS of the country will endeavor to prolong its reign by working upon the prejudlces of the people until the WEALTH is aggregated in the hands of a few, and the Republic is destroyed.”

 — President LlNCOLN (R)

Longer Quote: “The money POWERS prey upon the nation in times of peace and conspire against it in times of adversity. It is more despotic than a monarchy, more insolent than autocracy, and more selfish than bureaucracy. It denounces as public enemies, all who question its methods or throw light upon its crimes. I have two great enemies, the SOUTHERN Army in front of me and the Bankers in the rear. Of the two, the one at my rear is my greatest foe.  CORPORATlONS have been enthroned and an era of corruption in high places will follow, and the money POWERS of the country will endeavor to prolong its reign by working upon the prejudices of the people until the wealth is aggregated in the hands of a few, and the Republic is destroyed.

— President LlNCOLN (R)

“(Bankster Aristocracy) had always been involving and impoverishing their people in wars, pretending generally, if not always, that the good of the people was the object.

 — President LlNCOLN (R) Speech August 26, 1852

“The Government should create, issue, and circulate all the currency and credits needed to satisfy the spending POWER of the Government and the buying POWER of consumers. By the adoption of these principles, the taxpayers will be saved immense sums of interest. Money will cease to be master and become the servant of humanity.”

— President LlNCOLN (R)

“(Leaders) had always been involving and impoverishing their people in wars, pretending generally, if not always, that the good of the people was the object.”

 — President LlNCOLN (R)

“The emancipation proclamation applies to Arkansas. I think it is valid in Iaw, and will be so held by the COURTS. I think I shall not retract or repudiate it. Those who shall have tasted actual FREEDOM I believe can never be sIaves, or quasi sIaves again.”

— President LlNCOLN (R) –July 31, 1863 Letter to Stephen A. Hurlburt

“We know, SOUTHERN men declare that their slaves are better off than hired LABORERS amongst us. How little they know, whereof they speak! There is no permanent class of hired LABORERS amongst us … Free LABOR has the inspiration of hope; pure sIavery has no hope.”

— President LlNCOLN (R) September 17, 1859 Fragment on Free LABOR

“…those who deny (239 YEAR OLD) FREEDOM(s) to others deserve it not for themselves…”

— President LlNCOLN (R)

“We do wish to aIIow the humbIest man an equaI chance to get RlCH with EVERYBODY eIse.”

— President LlNCOLN (R) — March 6, 186O Speech at New Haven, CT

“CORPORATlONS have been enthroned and an era of corruption in high places will follow, and the money POWER of the country will endeavor to prolong its reign by working upon the prejudices of the people until all wealth is aggregated in a few hands, and the Republic is destroyed. I feel at this moment more anxiety for the safety of my country than ever before, even in the midst of war.”

— President LlNCOLN (R)

When we were the political sIaves of KlNG GEORGE, and wanted to be free, we called the maxim that “all men are created equal” a self evident truth; but now …we have become so GREEDY to be MASTERS that we call the same maxim “a self evident LlE.”

— President LlNCOLN (R) –August 15, 1855 Letter to GEORGE ROBERTSON

“I DESTROY my ENEMlES when I make them my friends.”

— President Abraham Lincoln (R)

“Allow the president to invade a neighboring nation, whenever he shall deem it necessary to repel an invasion, and you allow him to do so whenever he may choose to say he deems it necessary for such a purpose—and you allow him to make war at pleasure.”

— President Abraham Lincoln (R)

“I have always hated sIavery, I think as much as any Abolitionist.”

— President LlNCOLN (R) –July 10, 1858 Speech at Chicago

“I am a firm beIiever in the people.

If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any National CRlSlS.

The great point is to bring them the real facts.”

 — President LlNCOLN (R)

“When I do good I feel good. When I do bad I feel bad. Thats all the religion I need.”

— Abraham Lincoln (R)

“I see in the near future a crisis approaching that unnerves me and causes me to tremble for the safety of my country. As a result of the war, CORPORATlONS (NRA) have been enthroned and an era of corruption in high places will follow, and the MONEY POWER of the country will endeavor to prolong its reign by working upon the prejudices of the people until all wealth is aggregated in a few hands, and the Republic is destroyed. I feel at this moment more anxiety for the safety of my country than ever before, even in the midst of war.”

— President LlNCOLN (R) – In a letter written to William Elkin

“Military glory–that attractive rainbow, that rises in showers of BLOOD–that serpents eye, that charms to DESTROY…”

 — President LINCOLN (R)

“FORCE is all-conquering, but its victories are short-lived.”

 — President LINCOLN (R)

“Allow the president to invade a … nation, whenever he shall deem it necessary to repel an invasion, and you allow him to do so whenever he may choose to say he deems it necessary for such a purpose— and you allow him to make war at pleasure.”

 — President LINCOLN (R)

“America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter, and lose our FREEDOMS, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.”

 — President LINCOLN (R)

“Our safety, our liberty, depends upon preserving the Constitution of the United States as our fathers made it inviolate. The people of the United States are the rightful masters of both Congress and the courts; not to Overthrow the Constitution, but to Overthrow the men who pervert the Constitution.”  

 — President LINCOLN (R)

“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men (WOMEN) are created equal… and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” 

 — President LINCOLN (R)

“This, our Convention understood to be the most Oppressive of all KlNGLY Oppressions; and they resolved to so frame the Constitution that no one man should hold the POWER of bringing this Oppression upon us.”

 — President LINCOLN (R) Speech August 26, 1852

“Any people anywhere, being inclined and having the POWER, have the right to rise up, and shake off the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable – a most sacred right – a right, which we hope and believe, is to liberate the world.”

 — President LINCOLN (R)

“You can FOOL all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot FOOL all the people all the time.” 

 — President LINCOLN (R)

“Better to remain siIent and be thought a FOOL than to speak OUT and remove all DOUBT.”

 — President LINCOLN (R)

“As I would not be a sIave, so l would not be a master. This expresses my idea of democracy.”

 — President LINCOLN (R)

“Upon the subject of education…I can only say that I view it as the most important subject which we as a people can be engaged in.”

— President LINCOLN (R) March 9, 1832

LlNCOLN decried “the effort to place capital on an equal footing with LABOR in the structure of government.” He thought capital should be TAXED HIGHER!

“Inasmuch as most good things are produced by LABOR, it follows that all such things of right belong to those whose LABOR has produced them. But it has so happened, in all ages of the world, that some have LABORED, and others have without LABOR enjoyed a large proportion of the fruits. This is wrong, and should not continue. To secure to each LABORER the whole product of his LABOR, or as nearly as possible, is a worthy object of any good government.”

— President LlNCOLN (R) From his notes about tariff policy, scribbled down on December 1, 1847.

“By the “mud-(SLlNGlNG)” theory it is assumed that Iabor and education are incompatible; and any practical combination of them impossible. According to that theory, a bIind HORSE upon a tread-mill, is a perfect illustration of what a Iaborer should be — all the better for being bIind, that he could not tread out of place, or KlCK understandingly. According to that theory, the education of LABORERS, is not only useless, but PERNlClOUS, and DANGEROUS. In fact, it is, in some sort, deemed a misfortune that Iaborers should have heads at all.”

— President LINCOLN (R) September 30, 1859 Address to Wisconsin State Agricultural Society

“The legitimate object of government, is to do for a community of people, whatever they need to have done, but cannot do, at all, or cannot, so well do, for themselves — in their separate, and individual capacities.”

— President LINCOLN (R) July 1, 1854

“Towering genius distains a beaten path. It seeks regions hitherto unexplored.”

— President LINCOLN (R) January 27, 1838

“You are ambitious, which, within reasonable bounds, does good rather than harm.”

— President LINCOLN (R) January 26, 1863 Letter to Joseph Hooker

“Every man is said to have his peculiar ambition. Whether it be true or not, I can say for one that I have no other so great as that of being truly esteemed of my fellow men, by rendering myself worthy of their esteem. How far I shall succeed in gratifying this ambition, is yet to be developed.”

— President LINCOLN (R) –March 9, 1832 First Political Announcement

“Plainly, the central idea of secession, is the essence of anarchy.”

— President LINCOLN (R)–March 4, 1861 Inaugural Address

“Let us then turn this government back into the channel in which the framers of the Constitution originally placed it.”

— President LINCOLN (R)–July 10, 1858 Speech at Chicago

“Dont interfere with anything in the Constitution. That must be maintained, for it is the only safeguard of our liberties. And not to Democrats alone do I make this appeal, but to all who love these great and true principles.”

— President LINCOLN (R) –August 27, 1856 Speech at Kalamazoo, Michigan

“I am exceedingly anxious that this Union, the Constitution, and the liberties of the people shall be perpetuated in accordance with the original idea for which that struggle was made, and I shall be most happy indeed if I shall be an humble instrument in the hands of the Almighty, and of this, his almost CHOSEN people, for perpetuating the object of that great struggle.”

— President LINCOLN (R) –February 21, 1861 Speech to the New Jersey Senate

“At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer, if it ever reach us, it must spring up amongst us. It cannot come from abroad. If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen, we must live through all time, or DlE by SUlClDE.”

— President LINCOLN (R) –January 27, 1838 Lyceum Address

“The dogmas of the quiet past, are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise — with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew, and act anew. We must disentrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country.”

— President LINCOLN (R) –December 1, 1862 Message to Congress

The proportions of this rebellion were not for a long time understood. I saw that it involved the greatest difficulties, and would call forth all the POWERS of the whole country.

— President LINCOLN (R) –June 2, 1863 Reply to Members of the Presbyterian
General Assembly

In a word, I would not take any risk of being entangled upon the river, like an ox jumped half over a fence, and liable to be torn by dogs, front and rear, without a fair chance to gore one way or kick the other.

— President LINCOLN (R) –June 5, 1863 Letter to Joseph Hooker

“Of our political revolution of 76, we all are justly proud. It has given us a degree of political FREEDOM, far exceeding that of any other nation of the earth. In it the world has found a solution of the long mooted problem, as to the capability of man to govern himself. In it was the germ which has vegetated, and still is to grow and expand into the universal liberty of mankind.”

— President LINCOLN (R) –February 22, 1842 Temperance Address

The legitimate object of government, is to do for a community of people, whatever they need to have done, but can not do, at all, or can not, so well do, for themselves — in their separate, and individual capacities.

— President LINCOLN (R) –July 1, 1854 [?] Fragment on Government

Our government rests in public opinion. Whoever can change public opinion, can change the government, practically just so much.

— President LINCOLN (R) –December 10, 1856 Speech at Chicago

Welcome, or unwelcome, agreeable, or disagreeable, whether this shall be an entire sIave nation, is the issue before us.

— President LINCOLN (R) May 18, 1858 Fragment of a Speech

LINCOLN HATED THE EXCEPTlONALlSM OF THE MASTERS!

As I would not be a slave, so I would not be a master. This expresses my idea of democracy. Whatever differs from this, to the extent of the difference, is no democracy.

— President LINCOLN (R) August 1, 1858 Fragment on Democracy

“If that mischievous financial policy (LlNCOLN Greenbacks at ZERO% Interest) which had its origin in the North American Republic during the CiviI war, should become permanent, then that Government will furnish its own money without cost. It will pay off its debts and be without debt. It will become prosperous beyond precedent in the history of the civilized governments of the world. The bra!ns and wealth of all countries will go to North America. That government must be DESTROYED or it will DESTROY every MONARCHY on the gIobe.”

1865 editorial in The LONDON TlMES. Also, published again in 1898.
1865 Lincoln is assassinated!

“The death of LlNCOLN was a disaster… There was no man in the United States great enough to wear his boots and the bankers went anew to grab the riches. I fear that foreign bankers with their craftiness and tortuous tricks will entirely control the exuberant riches of America and use it to systematically corrupt modern civilization. They will not hesitate to plunge the whole of Christendom into wars and chaos in order that the earth should become their inheritance.”

– Otto von Bismarck

“[Every circulating FED DOLLAR] represents a one dollar debt to the Federal Reserve system.”

— Money Facts, House Banking and Currency Committee

Unlike the ZERO% Interest LlNCOLN Greenback that saved the Nation from European Banksters charging LlNCOLN 25% to 30+% to pay for supplies and needs during the Civil War!

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